On May 13, 2024, President Biden issued an order (the “Order”) requiring MineOne Partners Limited, a company majority owned by Chinese nationals, and certain affiliates (together, “MineOne”) to divest previously acquired real estate (the “Real Estate”) in Wyoming located near Francis E. Warren Air Force Base (“Warren AFB”).  The Order gives MineOne 120 days to divest the Real Estate and includes strict monitoring measures to allow the U.S. government to supervise the sale of the Real Estate to an approved buyer.Continue Reading President Biden Issues Order Requiring Chinese Owner to Divest Cryptocurrency Mining Facility Near U.S. Military Base

On February 1, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit unanimously granted a preliminary injunction in Shen v. Simpson, enjoining enforcement of a Florida law regulating foreign ownership of U.S. land.  That law prohibits citizens of the People’s Republic of China who are not lawful permanent residents of the United States from purchasing certain real property in Florida.  The Eleventh Circuit’s ruling enjoined enforcement of the law against two individual plaintiffs, and the court held that those plaintiffs had shown a “substantial likelihood of success” on their claim that the Florida law was preempted by the Foreign Risk Review Modernization Act of 2018 (“FIRRMA”), the most recent federal statute expanding the authority of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (“CFIUS”), including with respect to certain real estate transactions.  In concurrence with the majority, Judge Abudu wrote that the plaintiffs also showed a substantial likelihood of success on their argument that Florida’s law violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.Continue Reading U.S. Circuit Court Finds that Florida Law Prohibiting Foreign Ownership of U.S. Land Likely Preempted by CFIUS Statute

The following post was originally included as part of our recently published memorandum “Selected Issues for Boards of Directors in 2024”.

Continued volatility in geopolitical events this past year and corresponding responses in sanctions policies highlight the importance of integrating economic sanctions considerations in board agendas for 2024. In particular, boards of directors should be aware of the increasing global collaboration among sanctions authorities as well as the continuing expansion and application of sanctions in new domains such as digital assets. Sanctions developments can be expected to be particularly fluid in 2024 with respect to China, Russia and Venezuela.Continue Reading Economic Sanctions: Developments and Lessons for Boards in 2024

On August 9, 2023, the Biden Administration issued the long-awaited Executive Order on Addressing United States Investments in Certain National Security Technologies and Products in Countries of Concern (the “EO”) and accompanying Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (the “ANPRM”) setting forth the proposed contours of an outbound investment regime targeting China.[1]  Under the proposed regime, U.S. persons would be prohibited from making, or required to notify the U.S. government regarding, certain investments in entities engaged in certain activities relating to semiconductors and microelectronics, quantum information technologies, and artificial intelligence (“AI”) in “countries of concern” (presently limited to China, Hong Kong, and Macau).  The United States currently has the authority to review inbound foreign investment through the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (“CFIUS”).Continue Reading U.S. Government Unveils Proposal for Outbound Investment Regime Targeting China

The following post was originally included as part of our recently published memorandum “Selected Issues for Boards of Directors in 2023”.

This past year’s Russia-Ukraine conflict sparked a significant transformation of the global economic sanctions landscape, with developments and lessons extending well beyond Russia. 

In 2023, boards of directors should continue to monitor

On January 5, 2023, President Biden signed into law the Protecting American Intellectual Property Act of 2022 (the “PAIP Act”),[1] bipartisan legislation that authorizes the imposition of sanctions on foreign persons that have engaged in significant theft of trade secrets of U.S. persons.[2] Continue Reading PAIP Act Authorizes Sanctions for Trade Secret Theft by Chinese Actors

2022 did not see as many legislative changes of the German foreign direct investment regime (“FDI Regime“) as in years before. However, several foreign direct investments with a Chinese nexus reviewed by the German FDI authority, the Federal Ministry of Economics and Climate Action (“BMWK“), attracted public attention in 2022:Continue Reading German FDI Reviews of Chinese Investments in 2022 Confirm the Current Trend – Strict Scrutiny and Political Dimension in Decision Making

On October 7, 2022, the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) announced an interim final rule and a final rule imposing new export controls designed to restrict China’s ability to obtain advanced computing chips, develop and maintain supercomputers, and manufacture advanced semiconductors.  According to BIS, the rules, which reflected consultation with close allies and partners, as well as private industry, and are being issued pursuant to the Export Control Reform Act of 2018, are part of the U.S. government’s ongoing review of export control policies toward China and follow several other regulatory and enforcement actions announced earlier this year (e.g., implementing multilateral export controls on advanced semiconductor and gas turbine engine technologies, on which we wrote about here).
Continue Reading The United States Tightens China-Related Export Controls on Advanced Computing and Semiconductor Manufacturing Items

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo recently expressed support for a screening regime to review outbound investments.[1]  This, as well as similar statements from the White House and the passage of legislation calling for such a process earlier this year, signals that certain outbound investments could be subject to U.S. regulatory review and approval in the near future.[2]
Continue Reading Support for “Reverse CFIUS” Outbound Investment Screening Regime Grows

The U.S. National Science and Technology Council (NSTC)[1] recently published an updated list of critical and emerging technologies (CETs) as part of an ongoing effort to identify advanced technologies that are potentially significant to U.S. national security.
Continue Reading Updates to the Critical and Emerging Technologies List Signal Additional Areas of Focus